Sunday, May 27, 2007

Addiction of the tree murdering kind.


I have a confession to make. I eluded to it on my environmental list, I am addicted to paper towels. They are great. They are clean, easily available and disposable. All the qualities I look for when dealing with dirty jobs, especially in the kitchen. I am probably personally responsible for the death of thousands of trees. I feel really bad about that. My addiction to paper towels is probably one of my worst environmental sins. Sadly, there is no 12 step program to save me or the planet from my horrible indiscretion. So, I am on my own to cure my disease. My plan of action-

1. Switch to post consumed paper towels. I have done this. These paper towels are not quite like "the quicker picker upper" but they work fine. Let's face it- they are really a crutch, though.
2. Clean out a cabinet to make room for rags, dish towels and wash cloths. I own plenty, it just a matter of making them convenient in my kitchen.
3. Start a daily habit of taking dirty rags, dish towels, and wash cloths up to the laundry.

Easier said than done for me. I am seriously addicted. I'll keep you posted on my progress. I have to admit, of all the things, this is probably going to be one of the hardest for me!

The picture is of the beloved (tree murdering, toxic bleaching chemical leaching) Bounty.

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8 comments:

Leah J. Utas said...

I have this problem myself although it's getting better.
We use rags for cleaning most of the time although the notable exception is the stovetop.
Also, my husband uses handkerchiefs that he sews himself from rags and he's made some for me, too.
Because you've already made up your mind to make these changes, it will be easier than you think.
I know you can do it.

Dawn said...

Guilty as charged.

I grew up in an old-fashioned household where the was a box of rags to be used for cleaning jobs and unless the said job was downright disgusting, they were washed out and reused. No paper towel ever saw the inside of my childhood home.

They're so damn convenient, that's the trouble. I'm trying to wean myself off them too.

Crabby McSlacker said...

I have the same problem too.

And like Dawn, I blame my childhood home.

To economize growing up, we didn't buy paper towels very often, nor "expensive" kleenex (TP would do fine for stuffy noses). So as an adult, it always feels wonderfully decadent to use either product, and I'm reluctant to give up that thrill, even though I know they're wasteful.

Samantha said...

I am glad I am not the only one. Maybe we can start a support group. I think that this proves there could be plenty of members.
Paper towels are like the devil, tempting us with the clean white sanitary, disposability.
I use kleenex too, but I am switching to the post consumption ones made with recycled paper. It maybe a crutch too but, I do not want to resort to wiping my nose on my sleeve. My mom taught me not to do that.:)

Lady Rose said...

I also share that addiction - but your suggestions are good ones. Definitely something I need to get better at! Lady Rose

Urban Vegan said...

And here's one more idea--only use half a paper towel. You'd be surprised at how this can stretch a roll.

Jennifer said...

I think it does help to keep your cleaning cloths organized and in easy reach. We use old cloths and cut up towels to clean with, not paper towels, at my house. You know what really works. Figure out all the money you'll save by not buying paper towels for a year. Just think -- you can use the money to buy anything...shoes, cool soap, more old cloths (just kidding). You can't use the money to buy Bounty -- that would be against the rules.

Debra Solomon at culiblog said...

Why don't you try using sponge towels. They are the size of a washcloth, they absorb like a fine sponge and when they start to stink you throw them in the washing machine as wash them with the other house rags.

They don't last as long as a washcloth - but they're as absorbant or more than a paper towel.

I usually wash them in the machine every month. They last about 3 months.